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Supplementary Report from Complainant

Case #96-03-5191

Redwood City, California, Police Department

This report supplements a telephone report made by telephone on March 27, 1996, at approximately 8:30 PM, to Officer C. O'Keefe, who stated that her badge number is 139, of the Redwood City, California, Police Department, 415/780-7100, 780/7112F.

The address of the offense is 1755 East Bayshore Road #9A, Redwood City, California 94063, which is a unit in an office complex called the Mid-Peninsula Business Park, owned by 1735 & 1755 East Bayshore Partners, associated with Beals, Martin & Assoc., whose main office is at 2596 Bay Road, Redwood City, California 94063. The Property Manager is Eileen Kelleher. Their phone is 415/364-8141.

The Complainant is Jon Roland, presently of 1731 Howe Av #370, Sacramento, California 95825, whose phone is 916/927-4935. He is president of the Starflight Corporation, a Texas corporation. He was until recently the tenant at the address of the offense.

Complainant has been away from the premises for more than two years. He had made arrangements with the owner of the complex to vacate the premises and move the contents of the premises to another location nearby. The move was conducted by an employee of the owner, Jose (last name unknown), and one of the owners (according to the property manager), Dennis (last name unknown). Discovery of the offense occurred on March 27, 1996, at about 11:15 AM, when the Complainant inspected the premises during the final stage of the move.

Complainant went to the hiding place of three firearms, which he suspected the movers had failed to find, despite his instructions of where to look for them. They had been hidden in a ceiling space above the second-storey office of the two-storey office unit. He found two of them, a .22LR rifle and a 12 gauge shotgun, each in their soft camouflage cases, but the third, a Heckler & Koch (H&K) 91, serial number A026630, was missing, together with two loaded magazines, although the soft camouflage case in which it had been left was still there. This firearm is typically priced at more than $3000.00 at gun shows. This firearm is one of the models on the list of weapons required to be registered under the Roberti-Roos California statute, and the Complainant is one of the (few) persons to have duly registered this weapon (and others on the list) in a timely manner, although he used another address in the registrations than the address of the premises, so the perpetrators could not have found the address from inspecting the registration records.

Also apparently missing from the premises is one of two grey, five-drawer file cabinets, which when the Complainant last left it contained a number of important business records. The Complainant is continuing to try to identify what items may be missing, and to investigate the events leading up to the discovery by interrogating potential witnesses.

Eileen Kelleher left a telephone message for the Complainant at 12:57 PM stating that she had photographs of the interior of the premises taken just prior to the move which did not show the presence of the second file cabinet at that time.

Several considerations may provide a profile of who might have taken the missing items and when.

Until early 1995, Complainant had an outside lock on the premises manufactured by MedecoŽ, which offers a high degree of protection from unauthorized entry. Sometime in early 1995, according to statements by Jenifer K Gardella, attorney for the owner, the lock was changed to conform to the standard lock used by the other units, keyed to the same master, of a conventional type which poses no significant impediment to unauthorized entry. The Complainant protested this change on these grounds.

The Complainant had not revealed the exact location of the hidden firearms to any other person prior to the discovery of the loss. He had revealed the fact that there were firearms hidden somewhere in one of the ceilings to a friend, Ms. Shelley Thomson, but this was done after the lock was changed and her copy of the key did not work, and she did not have unsupervised access to the premises after that time. In any case, she had a medical condition that would have made it impossible for her to access the hiding place. The disclosure was made to her by phone, and could only have been overheard by someone tapping the telephone conversation. If the perpetrator did not tap the phone, he or they were highly adept at finding hidden items. One must suspect that they left the case so that a casual inspection would not reveal its loss, and had a purpose that did not require taking any but that particular weapon.

There were numerous other valuable items on the premises more marketable than the items missing. Computers. Software. A copier. Printers. Other office equipment. A Hi-Fi system. Other firearms. One must ask why he or they would take a heavy file cabinet and leave the other items unless he or they were more interested in the contents of the file cabinet. But then one must ask why they did not just take the contents and leave the cabinet, unless they were in a hurry, and if they were in a hurry, and are the same persons who took the rifle, then they must have known where to look for the rifle.

The Complainant is a prominent political activist and reformer, born in San Francisco March 27, 1944. He was a reform candidate for the U.S. House of Representatives in the 1974 Texas 23rd Congressional District Democratic Primary against the incumbent, who represented a corrupt political machine based in Laredo. Although he did not win (officially), during the campaign he induced a number of witnesses to come forward, as a result of which several key figures in the Laredo machine were indicted, the machine collapsed, and reform candidates replaced them. He has been active throughout his life in investigating and exposing high-level corruption and abuse. He is the founder and president of the Constitution Society, dedicated to restoring constitutional governance in the United States and around the world, which has a site on the World Wife Web at http://www.constitution.org/. In April, 1974, following the formation of the Constitution Society and its initial reform activities, he suffered the theft from his office of a computer under circumstances that indicate federal involvement. Details of this incident can be found on the above Web site. In April, 1995, he was interviewed as a guest on Dateline NBC. During the past year he has been active in the investigation and exposure of criminal activities in the U.S. Justice Department and other federal agencies under the Reagan, Bush and Clinton administrations.

Jon Roland, Complainant

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